Comedy of errors monologue. Emilia's Monologue from The Comedy of Errors 2019-01-08

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Comedy of Errors, Act II, Scene 1 :

comedy of errors monologue

Keep then fair league and truce with thy true bed; I live unstain'd, thou undishonoured. From this time Such I account thy love. This course I fittest choose, For forty ducats is too much to lose. Doing displeasure to the citizens By rushing in their houses, bearing thence Rings, jewels, anything his rage did like. As a wife, Adriana is not the stereotypical shrewish and nagging woman.

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The Comedy Of Errors Monologue

comedy of errors monologue

There did this perjur'd goldsmith swear me down That I this day of him receiv'd the chain, Which, God he knows, I saw not; for the which He did arrest me with an officer. London: C and J Ollier, 1820. She spends much of the play worrying that her husband loves another woman. Where were then the joys,The mother's joys of watching, nourishing,And loving him? Why, headstrong liberty is lash'd with woe. Adriana speaks often in the play, and serves as a balance to her idealistic sister about the very real travails of love and marriage.

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The Comedy of Errors Monologues

comedy of errors monologue

Shall love, in building, grow so ruinous? Teach me, dear creature, how to think and speak: Lay open to my earthy-gross conceit, Smother'd in errors, feeble, shallow, weak, The folded meaning of your words' deceit. Antipholus who proposes to Luciana, not E. How comes it now, my husband, O, how comes it, That thou art thus estranged from thyself? Thy substance, valu'd at the highest rate, Cannot amount unto a hundred marks; Therefore, by law thou art condemn'd to die. Go back again, thou slave, and fetch him home. When the Abbess talks to Adriana about how she needs to reign in E. That's not my fault; he's master of my state: What ruins are in me that can be found By him not ruin'd? I see, the jewel best enamelled Will lose his beauty; and though gold bides still That others touch, yet often touching will Wear gold; and no man that hath a name, By falsehood and corruption doth it shame. This is the fairy land: O spite of spites! Monologue Text And thereof came it that the man was mad.

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Classic Monologue for Women

comedy of errors monologue

In food, in sport, and life-preserving rest To be disturb'd, would mad or man or beast: The consequence is then, thy jealous fits Have scar'd thy husband from the use of wits. I am possess'd with an adulterate blot; My blood is mingled with the crime of lust: For if we too be one and thou play false, I do digest the poison of thy flesh, Being strumpeted by thy contagion. Transform me then, and to your power I'll yield. Then, altogether They fell upon me, bound me, bore me thence, And in a dark and dankish vault at home There left me and my man, both bound together; Till, gnawing with my teeth my bonds in sunder, I gain'd my freedom, and immediately Ran hither to your Grace; whom I beseech To give me ample satisfaction For these deep shames and great indignities. Unseemly woman is a seeming man! It seems his sleeps were hinder'd by thy railing, And therefore comes it that his head is light. Perhaps some merchant hath invited him, And from the mart he's somewhere gone to dinner. Women's Monologues in The Comedy of Errors Making it easier to find monologues since 1997.

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Men's Monologues in The Comedy of Errors

comedy of errors monologue

Then fairly I bespoke the officer To go in person with me to my house. My decayed fair A sunny look of his would soon repair; But, too unruly deer, he breaks the pale And feeds from home: poor I am but his stale. The reason that I gather he is mad, Besides this present instance of his rage, Is a mad tale he told to-day at dinner, Of his own doors being shut against his entrance. . I am not partial to infringe our laws: The enmity and discord which of late Sprung from the rancorous outrage of your duke To merchants, our well-dealing countrymen, Who, wanting guilders to redeem their lives, Have seal'd his rigorous statutes with their bloods, Excludes all pity from our threat'ning looks. If you did wed my sister for her wealth, Then, for her wealth's sake use her with more kindness: Or, if you like elsewhere, do it by stealth; Muffle your false love with some show of blindness; Let not my sister read it in your eye; Be not thy tongue thy own shame's orator; Look sweet, speak fair, become disloyalty; Apparel vice like virtue's harbinger; Bear a fair presence, though your heart be tainted; Teach sin the carriage of a holy saint; Be secret-false: what need she be acquainted? Ere I learn love, I'll practise to obey.

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Men's Monologues in The Comedy of Errors

comedy of errors monologue

Anon, I wot not by what strong escape, He broke from those that had the guard of him, And with his mad attendant and himself, Each one with ireful passion, with drawn swords Met us again, and, madly bent on us Chas. Wouldst thou not spit at me and spurn at me, And hurl the name of husband in my face, And tear the stain'd skin off my harlot-brow, And from my false hand cut the wedding-ring And break it with a deep-divorcing vow? His company must do his minions grace, Whilst I at home starve for a merry look. By my holy order, I thought thy disposition better tempered. Here comes your man; now is your husband nigh. I see, the jewel best enamelled Will lose his beauty; and though gold bides still That others touch, yet often touching will Wear gold; and no man that hath a name, By falsehood and corruption doth it shame. That hierarchy she set up earlier, with man above woman? So, Act I has this pitched argument between the two sisters, with Adrianna standing for equality of the sexes at least in marriage and Luciana arguing for a definite order — men on top, women subservient.

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Classic Monologue for Women

comedy of errors monologue

Adriana - Ay, ay, Antipholus, look strange, and frown: Some other mistress hath thy sweet aspects, I am not Adriana, nor thy wife. Why, mistress, sure my master is horn-mad. The venom clamours of a jealous woman Poisons more deadly than a mad dog's tooth. I cross me for a sinner. How comes it now, my husband, O! Quoth my master: 'I know,' quoth he, 'no house, no wife, no mistress. Despite our sympathy, we recognize that Adriana is still shrewish to some extent. Here, she embodies all the very real concerns of a faithful wife — perhaps she is no longer attractive to her husband, and while he might be at fault for his roving, she still loves him, and would do anything in her power to keep him.

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The Comedy of Errors Men's Monologues

comedy of errors monologue

Hath homely age the alluring beauty took From my poor cheek? But, were you wedded, you would bear some sway. Monologue Text Ay, ay, Antipholus, look strange and frown: Some other mistress hath thy sweet aspects; I am not Adriana nor thy wife. I say yourself because you are a stranger to me now, but when we are indivisible and united in one body, I am better than the best part of you. Boston: Little, Brown, and Co. She worries that her husband has gone wandering in love from her, but she accedes that this might be her own fault. The time was once when thou unurged wouldst vow That never words were music to thine ear, That never object pleasing in thine eye, That never touch well welcome to thy hand, That never meat sweet-savored in thy taste, Unless I spake, or looked, or touched, or carved to thee. Thou say'st his sports were hinderd by thy brawls: Sweet recreation barr'd, what doth ensue But moody and dull melancholy, Kinsman to grim and comfortless despair, And at her heels a huge infectious troop Of pale distemperatures and foes to life? William Shakespeare The Comedy of Errors Act 5 sc.

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The Comedy of Errors: Adriana's Monologue

comedy of errors monologue

Balthazar - Have patience, sir; O! Is this the kindness that thou counterfeits? Sister, you know he promised me a chain; 380 Would that alone, alone he would detain, So he would keep fair quarter with his bed! Thyself I call it, being strange to me, That, undividable, incorporate, Am better than thy dear self's better part. How dearly would it touch thee to the quick, Shouldst thou but hear I were licentious, And that this body, consecrate to thee, By ruffian lust should be contaminate! My wife, not meanly proud of two such boys, Made daily motions for our home return: Unwilling I agreed; alas! Thy form cries out thou art; Thy tears are womanish, thy wild acts denote The unreasonable fury of a beast. Belike his wife, acquainted with his fits, On purpose shut the doors against his way. Say, didst thou speak with him? Then, gentle brother, get you in again; Comfort my sister, cheer her, call her wife: 'Tis holy sport to be a little vain, When the sweet breath of flattery conquers strife. Why suck'st, from sodden moss and dripping stone, Toad-like, thy nourishment alone? William Shakespeare Comedy of Errors Act 2, sc.

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